Chickpea Walnut Sandwich

Get out of your lunchtime rut and make packing lunches more exciting with this Chickpea Walnut Sandwich. 

half of a chickpea walnut sandwich on a cutting board

Ever get in a lunch rut? Need new ideas for packing your kids’ or your own lunch? Are packable noontime options dwindling? Surely you’ve met the ‘What shall I pack for lunch?” question.

sandwich on rye bread with an apple

I always pack my lunch for the next day the night before. If not, I’m typically running out the door and a Siggi’s yogurt, KIND bar, and a piece of fruit are just tossed in my bag on my way out. I don’t mind those “snacky” kind of lunches once in a while, but I’d prefer more of a meal kind of lunch.

chickpea walnut sandwich on rye bread cut in half

Plant-Based Proteins:

This chickpea walnut sandwich is a plant-based tuna/chicken salad makeover. I always try and make sure protein is present at lunchtime to help keep me full through the afternoon. Chickpeas are the perfect pulse for this recipe because the firm texture holds its shape. The addition of the walnuts is key for the crunch factor, while also providing heart-healthy fats.

vegetarian sandwich on a cutting board

Greek yogurt is a great substitute for mayonnaise to trim back on saturated fat and replace it with a boost of protein and calcium instead.

Add to a sandwich, top on a salad, or dip with crackers – this chickpea walnut mixture is versatile to get you out of your lunchtime rut.

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cut in half chickpea sandwich

Chickpea Walnut Sandwich

  • Author: Chef Julie Harrington, RD
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Total Time: 15
  • Yield: 2 1x
  • Category: sandwich

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Ingredients

  • 1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • ⅓ cup chopped walnuts
  • 3 tablespoons plain Greek yogurt
  • ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 2 tablespoons scallions, thinly sliced
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 4 slices whole wheat bread, toasted
  • (Optional) Toppings: lettuce, tomato, onion

Instructions

  1. Add chickpeas to a bowl and lightly mash with a fork. (Not too much. We aren’t making hummus!) Add walnuts, Greek yogurt, Dijon mustard, honey, and scallions and mix together. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.
  2. Add a desired amount of the chickpea mixture to the bread and add desired toppings. Top with the other slice of bread.

Notes

Recipe adapted from Minimalist Baker.

Keywords: sandwich, vegetarian, plant-based

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Instant Pot Wheat Berries

Save time and utilize the Instant Pot to make hearty whole grains, like wheat berries. Learn how meal prepping a batch of whole grains can turn into various recipes throughout the week.

Instant Pot Wheat Berries -Save time and utilize your Instant Pot to make hearty whole grains, like wheat berries. via Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #instantpot #wheatberries #pressurecooker #wholegrain #mealprep #glutenfree

The Instant Pot continues to be magical. What takes over an hour to cook, now is done in 35 minutes.

Meal prep strategies

Every week now, I’ve been prepping at least one whole grain for the week. Everyone meal preps a little differently. I tend not to make full meals, but to get the cooking process started, like chopping veggies, making a batch of whole grains, grilling a few pieces of chicken, roasting a tray of veggies, etc.

This way, I am not mandated to a certain meal and it gives me more flexibility while allowing to save time during a busy week.

Instant Pot Wheat Berries -Save time and utilize your Instant Pot to make hearty whole grains, like wheat berries. via Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #instantpot #wheatberries #pressurecooker #wholegrain #mealprep #glutenfree

Meal prep tip:

Prep a batch of whole grains, like wheat berries, to add on top of a salad, in a stir-fry, mixed into a soup, as a side dish, or even served up breakfast-style. Switch up the prepped whole grain each week for variety.

Health benefits of wheat berries

Wheat berries contain 6 grams of protein, with over 20 percent of your daily value for dietary fiber, and 8 percent of your iron in each serving.

Instant Pot Wheat Berries -Save time and utilize your Instant Pot to make hearty whole grains, like wheat berries. via Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #instantpot #wheatberries #pressurecooker #wholegrain #mealprep #glutenfree

What are Wheat Berries?

Wheat Berries are the whole grain form of wheat – the whole, complete grain before it has undergone any processing. They’re a high-fiber whole grain, containing the bran, germ, and the endosperm. Wheat berries typically take longer to cook because they are not processed and it takes a while for the liquid to penetrate through the bran to soften the grain.

When cooked, wheat berries have a chewy bite and a subtle nutty, earthy flavor. They’re sturdy enough to handle bold dressings in salads and still delicate enough to taste delicious with some milk, honey, and cinnamon.

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wheat berries in a white bowl with a blue and white striped napkin

Instant Pot Wheat Berries

  • Author: Chef Julie Harrington, RD
  • Prep Time: 5 mins
  • Cook Time: 30 mins
  • Total Time: 35 mins
  • Yield: 4 1x
  • Category: side dish
  • Method: Instant Pot

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Ingredients

  • 3 cups water
  • 1 cup hard red spring wheat berries
  • Pinch of salt

Instructions

  1. Combine water, wheat berries, and salt in the Instant Pot. Secure the lid and seal the valve.
  2. Set the manual timer for 35 minutes.
  3. When done, do quick release by moving the valve to vent the steam. Let all the steam release.
  4. Drain the wheat berries and enjoy as is or incorporate into other recipes.

Keywords: instant pot, pressure cooker, wheat berries, whole grain, meal prep

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Whole Grains 101

Today is Sample Whole Grains Day! To celebrate, I am sharing the inside scoop about whole grains and sharing whole grain recipes from Registered Dietitians.
Whole Grains 101 via RDelicious Kitchen @RD_KitchenWhat are whole grains?
All grains start as whole grains. Whole grains are the entire seed of a plant. The seed, also called a “kernel”, is made up of three edible parts – the bran, the germ, and the endosperm.
Bran: The bran is the multi-layered outer skin of the edible kernel. It contains important antioxidants, B vitamins, and fiber.
Germ: The germ is the embryo which has the potential to sprout into a new plant. It contains many B vitamins, some protein, minerals, and healthy fats.
Endosperm: The endosperm is the germ’s food supply, which provides essential energy to the young plant so it can send roots down for water and nutrients, and send sprouts up for sunlight’s photosynthesizing power. The endosperm is by far the largest portion of the kernel. It contains starchy carbohydrates, proteins and small amounts of vitamins and minerals.

What is a “refined grain”?
“Refined grain” are processed (or milled) referring to grains that are not whole, because they are missing one or more of their three key parts (bran, germ, or endosperm). White flour and white rice are refined grains, for instance, because both have had their bran and germ removed, leaving only the endosperm.
Health Benefits of Whole Grains:
With the bran, germ, and endosperm being all intact, whole grains have a variety of health benefits. People who eat whole grains as part of a healthy diet have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Grains provide many nutrients that are vital for the health and maintenance of our bodies.

  • B vitamins (thiamin (Vitamin B1), riboflavin (Vitamin B2), niacin (Vitamin B3) and folate (Vitamin B9) are important in a variety of biological functions.
  • Folate (folic acid), one of the B vitamins, helps the body form new cells and can prevent certain birth defects.
  • Iron is used to carry oxygen in the blood.
  • Magnesium is a mineral that is involved in more than 300 processes in the body.
  • Selenium is important for a healthy immune system and regulating thyroid hormone action.

How to identify whole grains:
The Whole Grain Council has developed a Whole Grain Stamp to help consumers easily identify whole grains. There are three different varieties of the Whole Grain Stamp: the 100% Stamp, the 50%+ Stamp, and the Basic Stamp.
whole grain stamp
For more information, visit www.wholegrainscouncil.org

Oats:
Oats have a sweet flavor that makes them a favorite for breakfast cereals. Unique among grains, oats almost never have their bran and germ removed in processing. In the U.S., most oats are steamed and flattened to produce “old-fashioned” or regular oats, quick oats, and instant oats. The more oats are flattened and steamed, the quicker they cook – and the softer they become. If you prefer a chewier, nuttier texture, consider steel-cut oats, also sometimes called Irish or Scottish oats. Steel-cut oats consist of the entire oat kernel (similar in look to a grain of rice), sliced once or twice into smaller pieces to help water penetrate and cook the grain.
Whole Grains 101 + Whole Grain RecipesBaked Vanilla Oatmeal Custard via Nutrition to Fit
Carmalized Banana Dark Chocolate Oatmeal via Lively Table
Strawberry Chocolate Overnight Oats via Nutrition by Nazima
Peaches and Cream Overnight Oats via Nutritioulicious
Broccoli Cheddar Oatmeal Bake via Hungry Hobby
Almond Pistachio Cocoa Bites via Amy Gorin Nutrition
5 Ingredient Peanut Butter Granola Bars via The Real Food Dietitians
Barley:
Barley is one of the oldest cultivated grains.Barley has a particularly tough hull, which is difficult to remove without losing some of the bran. Hulled barley, available at health food stores, retains more of the whole-grain nutrients but is very slow-cooking.
Whole Grains 101 + Whole Grain RecipesMushroom Onion Barley via Nutritioulicious
Chicken Barley Stew via Call Me Betty
Butternut Squash, Beet, and Barely Salad via Buckey List Tummy
Persian Creamy Barley Soup via The Delicious Crescent
Risotto-Style Barley via Life Long Nutrition and Fitness
Farro:
Farro, also known as emmer, is an ancient strain of wheat, was one of the first cereals ever domesticated in the Fertile Crescent, and centuries later, it served as the standard daily ration of the Roman legions. But over the centuries, emmer was gradually abandoned in favor of durum wheat, which is easier to hull.
Whole Grains 101 + Whole Grain Recipes Grapefruit Arugula Farro Salad via Lively Table
Apple Farro Salad via Lively Table
Farro Buddha Bowl via Nutritioulicious
Spring Pea & Radish Farro Salad with Lemon Mint Vinaigrette via Nutritioulicious
Roasted Tomato, Farro, and Kale Salad via Euphoria Nutrition
Artichokes and Lemon Farro via One Hungry Bunny
Sorghum:
Farmers on the Great Plains from South Dakota to Texas appreciate that sorghum thrives where other crops would wither and die; in drought periods, in fact, it becomes partially dormant. Worldwide, about 50% of sorghum goes to human consumption. Sorghum can be eaten like popcorn, cooked into porridge, ground into flour for baked goods, or even brewed into beer.
Whole Grains 101 + Whole Grain RecipesSummer Sorghum Bowl with Sweet Corn Succotash via Street Smart Nutrition
Maple Poached Pear Breakfast Sorghum via Lively Table
Sweet Potato Sorghum Salad via Street Smart Nutrition
Roasted Root Vegetable Power Bowl via RDelicious Kitchen
Strawberry Vanilla Sorghum Parfait
via Nutrition Starring You
Stir-Fried Thai Sorghum Bowl via The Plant Powered Dietitian
Teff:
This nutritious and easy-to-grow type of millet is largely unknown outside of Ethiopia, India and Australia. Today it is getting more attention for its sweet, molasses-like flavor and its versatility; it can be cooked as porridge, added to baked goods, or even made into “teff polenta.” Teff grows in three colors: red, brown and white.
Whole Grains 101 + Whole Grain RecipesBrown Bread via Kumquat
Millet:
Millet is not just one grain but the name given to a group of several small related grains that have been around for thousands of years and are found in many diets around the world. They include pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum), foxtail millet (Setaria italica), proso millet (Panicum miliaceum), finger millet / ragi (Eleucine coracana), and fonio (Digitaria exilis). Millet’s incredible versatility means it can be used in everything from flatbreads to porridges, side dishes and desserts – even fermented and consumed as an alcoholic beverage.
Whole Grains 101 + Whole Grain RecipesCheesy Millet Sautéed Vegetables and Fried Egg via RDelicious Kitchen
Wild Blueberry & Caramel Galettes via Kumquat
Veggie Millet Skillet via Your Choice Nutrition
Amaranth:
Today amaranth is making its way back, thanks to a lively, peppery taste and a higher level of protein (it’s roughly 13-14% protein) compared to most other grains. In South America, it is often sold on the streets, popped like corn. Amaranth has no gluten, so it must be mixed with wheat to make leavened breads. It is popular in cereals, breads, muffins, crackers and pancakes.
Whole Grains 101 + Whole Grain RecipesHoney Balsamic Chicken, Kale & Amaranth via Snacking in Sneakers
Cherry Amaranth Almond Smoothie
via Live Best
Freekeh:
Freekeh is a hard wheat (often durum wheat) that is harvested when the plant is still young and green, then roasted and rubbed. This unique process gives freekeh its signature smoky flavor. Similar to bulgur wheat, freekeh is often sold cracked into smaller, quicker cooking pieces.
Whole Grains 101 + Whole Grain RecipesFreekeh Pilaf via Kroll’s Korner
Spicy Thai Freekeh Bowl Salad via Street Smart Nutrition
Freekeh Chicken & Cabbage Soup via Emily Kyle Nutrition
Tamari Freekeh Mango and Avocado Salad via Triad to Wellness
Moroccan Freekeh Pilaf via The Plant Powered Dietitian
Freekeh Soup with Du Puy Lentils and Kale via 80 Twenty Nutrition
resources:
https://wholegrainscouncil.org/
https://www.choosemyplate.gov
http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/

RDelicious Kitchen @RD_Kitchen

Roasted Root Vegetable Power Bowl

A comforting, satisfying plant-based bowl, this Roasted Root Vegetable Power Bowl is the perfect colorful fall dinner to cozy up to on a chilly night. 
Fall is my favorite season! I just love the cool, crisp weather, the beautiful fall foliage, and of course the food!
Roasted Root Vegetable Power Bowl via RDelicious Kitchen @RD_Kitchen
This time of year, I find myself roasting vegetables daily. Roasting is one of my favorite cooking methods for veggies, but there’s something about cracking the windows on a cool fall evening and cozying up with fluffy blankets with a warm comforting meal.
Recipe ReDux members were challenged to create a plant protein power bowl, packed with protein, fiber and color, plant power bowls are trendy and delicious.
Roasted Root Vegetable Power Bowl via RDelicious Kitchen @RD_Kitchen

I decided to use sorghum as my whole grain in this recipe because I was inspired when I met Katie Cavuto, RD at the sorghum booth at FNCE this past weekend. She just released a new cookbook “Whole Cooking and Nutrition” and I was able to sample her sorghum recipe.
Roasted Root Vegetable Power Bowl via RDelicious Kitchen @RD_KitchenHave you ever used sorghum before? When I counsel clients, I encourage them to expand their variety of whole grains in their diet. I often see that their first swap is switching white bread to whole wheat bread or white rice to brown rice, which is great, but I don’t want them to just stop there.
Ancient grains, like sorghum, have more nutrition bang for your buck. Sorghum, which doesn’t have an inedible hull like some other grains, is commonly eaten with all its outer layers, thereby retaining the majority of its nutrients. One serving of sorghum contains 5 grams of fiber and is a good source of iron!
Roasted Root Vegetable Power Bowl via RDelicious Kitchen @RD_Kitchen
I absolutely love how colorful this recipe is. More colors = more nutrients. Another plus is it’s so simple to make. Simply place your veggies on a pan to roast as you prep the remaining ingredients.
If you want a shortcut, you can use Love Beets instead of the mess of peeling beets at home. Love Beets come peeled, steamed and vacuum packed.

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Roasted Root Vegetable Power Bowl

Roasted Root Vegetable Power Bowl

  • Author: Julie @ RDelicious Kitchen
  • Yield: 4 1x

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Ingredients

  • 2 sweet potatoes, chopped
  • 4 beets, peeled and chopped
  • 4 carrots, peeled
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 bunch Swiss chard, roughly chopped
  • 1 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 cup sorghum
  • 4 cups water
  • 1/4 cup hummus (your favorite flavor!)
  • 1/4 cup goat cheese, crumbled
  • salt and pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Coat a large baking sheet with cooking spray. Toss sweet potatoes and beets with 1 tablespoon olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Bake for 15 minutes.
  2. Using a peeler, create long strands of carrots. Remove vegetables from oven, add carrots and toss. Bake for an additional 10-15 minutes until vegetables are fork tender. Remove from oven.
  3. In a large bowl, massage Swiss chard leaves with olive oil and apple cider vinegar. Add garlic powder, salt and pepper. Add Swiss chard on a large baking sheet. Roast for 10 minutes until Swiss chard is tender (not crispy).
  4. As vegetables are roasting, cook the sorghum. Add sorghum and water to a pot. Bring to a boil; cook 5 minutes. Turn heat down to low; cover and cook for about 45 minutes or until tender-firm. (for an extra boost of flavor, add a splash of vegetable stock with the water) Season with salt and pepper.
  5. Assemble your bowls, by adding sections of sweet potatoes, beets, carrots, Swiss chard, and sorghum. Add a dollop of hummus and sprinkle with goat cheese. Serve warm.

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RDelicious Kitchen @RD_Kitchen
Roasted Root Vegetable Power Bowl via RDelicious Kitchen @RD_Kitchen


Breakfast “Ice Cream” Sandwiches

On a hot summer morning, cool down with a this fun new breakfast twist. These raspberry chia Breakfast “Ice Cream” Sandwiches tastes like dessert and will nourish you through the morning!
Breakfast "Ice Cream" Sandwiches via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchenI was super excited when KIND featured my recipe on their newsletter including my classic green smoothie to pair with their Raspberry Chia Breakfast Bars.

If you haven’t noticed, KIND came out with these new breakfast bars. These new bars (the raspberry chia flavor in particular) contain 5 whole grains including: oats, millet, buckwheat, amaranth, and quinoa along with a filling 6 grams of fiber.
Breakfast "Ice Cream" Sandwiches via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchenIt is always important to eat balanced meals. My go-to tip for anyone (myself included) is to enjoy at least 3 food groups per meal (with at least one of them being a fruit or vegetable).
Breakfast "Ice Cream" Sandwiches via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchenThat little tip can go a long way. It will help with portion control because portion sizes will naturally start to shrink in order to include various other food groups on your plate. Plus, it will help reach the minimum recommendation of aiming to consume at least 5 fruits and vegetables a day. More matter!
Breakfast "Ice Cream" Sandwiches via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchenWhen I first tried these breakfast bars I usually paired them by dunking them in a yogurt with a side of fruit, so I was inspired by my combo to turn it more into a fun breakfast!
It feels like eating dessert for breakfast!
Breakfast "Ice Cream" Sandwiches via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen

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Breakfast “Ice Cream” Sandwiches on a cutting board

Breakfast “Ice Cream” Sandwiches

  • Author: Julie @ RDelicious Kitchen
  • Prep Time: 5 mins
  • Total Time: 5 mins
  • Yield: 4 1x

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Ingredients

  • 4 packages KIND raspberry chia breakfast bars (contains 2 bars per package)
  • 2 (5.3 oz.) containers plain (or vanilla) yogurt (I used Siggi’s)
  • 1 tablespoon chia seeds
  • 1/4 cup raspberries

Instructions

  1. In a small bowl, gently mash raspberries. Stir in chia seeds. Add yogurt and gently fold in raspberries and chia to make a raspberry swirl.
  2. Open up KIND breakfast bars packages. Scoop about 1/3 cup onto one side of the breakfast bar and spread evenly. Top with the other breakfast bar (not too tight, so filling doesn’t spill out!)
  3. Wrap each breakfast “ice cream” sandwich with plastic wrap and add to a sealed tight container. Place in the freezer for at least 2 hours or overnight.
  4. Unwrap and enjoy a treat in the morning!

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Breakfast "Ice Cream" Sandwiches via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen

Chocolate Chia Espresso Chip Cookies

Do you find baking relaxing? There is a reason why! Unwind and bake these Chocolate Chia Espresso Chip Cookies.
Chocolate Chia Espresso Chip Cookies via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen
After a super long day, I came home and wanted to bake. Baking is so relaxing to me. Is it because “stressed is desserts backwards” or is there a reason why there was a connection between baking and relieving stress?

According to the Massachusetts Public Health Blog, baking is a way to nurture our creative side – something we don’t do enough of. When feeling stressed or anxious, there’s something relaxing about losing yourself in the process of stirring, mixing, and kneading and at the end, treating yourself and others to something made from the soul. Doing something with your hands can be relaxing, similar to squeezing a stress ball or knitting. It helps take your mind off of your troubles, and releases negative energy that’s stored – channeling it into something creative. For some people, the repetitive motion of chopping is calming. Baking is a creative outlet that allows for experimentation. For some, baking is a coping skill to deal with life’s challenges, and a positive one at that – another one to add to your toolbox.
Chocolate Chia Espresso Chip Cookies via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen
As I was getting creative in the kitchen, I noticed I had used the last of my eggs when I made my favorite Swiss Chard and Mushroom Quiche the day before. Now worries, there are plenty of egg substitutions to use. I love the guide below as some really great egg free alternatives.
In a typical recipe for baked goods, eggs play the role of a binder or a leavening agent. A binder helps hold the recipe together, while a leavening agent helps your baked goodies to rise.

Chocolate Chia Espresso Chip Cookies via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen(source)

I went with the “chia egg”. I notice this method works best with cookies and brownies. The chia egg keeps the cookies soft and gooey, plus add a boost of fiber and omega-3’s.

Chocolate Chia Espresso Chip Cookies via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchenWhat egg free alternative have you tried in a baking recipe?

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hand holding a Chocolate Chia Espresso Chip Cookie

Chocolate Chia Espresso Chip Cookies

  • Author: Julie @ RDelicious Kitchen
  • Yield: 15 cookies 1x

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Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon chia seeds
  • 1/3 cup hot water
  • 1 medium ripe banana
  • 1/4 cup natural peanut butter
  • 1/2 tablespoon melted coconut oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 3/4 cup rolled oats
  • 1/4 cup oat flour
  • 1/4 cup garbanzo bean flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon espresso powder
  • 1/3 cup mini chocolate chips

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. In a small bowl, combine the chia seeds and hot water. Let sit for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Mixture will gel up and thicken.
  2. In a large bowl, mash the banana with a fork. Mix in the peanut butter, coconut oil, vanilla extract, maple syrup, and chia seeds, until combined.
  3. Add the rolled oats, oat flour, garbanzo bean flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and espresso powder. Mix until just combined.
  4. Gently fold in the chocolate chips.
  5. Scoop cookie dough by the tablespoonful onto a prepared baking sheet, sprayed with non stick spray, or lined with parchment or a silicone mat.
  6. Bake for 15-20 minutes until golden brown.

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Chocolate Chia Espresso Chip Cookies via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen

Protein Pancakes

Pancakes made with whole grains and packed with protein, will keep you full all morning! These pancakes don’t use protein powder to boost up their protein content. Can you guess what secret ingredients add that satisfying boost?
Protein Pancakes via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen
I’ve been making these protein pancakes for a few years now when I get that pancake craving. I never really liked pancakes growing up. (I was a weird kid) I think it was because I never felt satisfied. I always had them as more of a dessert, rather than breakfast.
Just by adding a few wholesome ingredients to a blender and BAM you got yourself a protein-packed pancake batter. How much easier can it get?
Protein Pancakes via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen
What makes the protein content so high? Cottage cheese and egg whites! One serving of these protein pancakes contain 19 grams of protein. The cottage cheese helps thicken the pancake batter for a fluffy pancake.

Protein Pancakes via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen
These pancakes have been posted way back when I first started blogging. I spruced up the pictures and tweaked the recipe a bit for improvement in both taste and nutrition.

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protein pancakes stacked with bananas and walnuts

Protein Pancakes

  • Author: Julie @ RDelicious Kitchen
  • Yield: 4 1x

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Ingredients

  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 1 cup cottage cheese
  • 1 cup egg whites
  • 1/4 cup ground flaxseed
  • 2 tablespoons cinnamon
  • 2 bananas

Instructions

  1. Combine rolled oats, cottage cheese, egg whites, ground flaxseed, cinnamon and banana in a blender to form a thick pancake batter like consistency. Do not over blend.
  2. Cook on a hot non-stick pan sprayed lightly with cooking spray until golden brown.
  3. Flip over until the other side is golden brown.
  4. (Optional) Top with additional banana slices, walnuts, and maple syrup.

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Protein Pancakes via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchenRecipe analysis via Calorie Count

Quinoa Stuffed Tomatoes

Six ingredient stuffed tomatoes with whole grains can be eaten as part of a main dish or as a vegetable side.

Quinoa Stuffed Tomatoes via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchenMost of my recipes are inspired of the game “What’s in my fridge?”. This usually happens at the end of the week, when there are leftovers or a few items here and there from other meals of the week. I feel like I’m en episode of Chopped and Ted Allen is giving me a mystery basket to cook with.
Quinoa Stuffed Tomatoes via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchenI used leftover quinoa, or you can use essentially any whole grain you like in this recipe. If you don’t have any leftover quinoa, you can always use this quick alternative.
This recipe can be easily adapted with the flavors you like. I added spinach, mushrooms, and garlic because that was what was in my fridge!
Quinoa Stuffed Tomatoes via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen
Have leftovers? The next morning, I reheated a quinoa stuffed tomato with a fried egg on top. A fried egg on top can make everything better.. am I right?
Now you can never say when you open your fridge, “I have nothing to eat!”. Just play “what’s in my fridge” and you’ll be surprised what you can come up with!

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Quinoa Stuffed Tomatoes

  • Author: Julie @ RDelicious Kitchen

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Ingredients

  • 4 medium tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup cooked quinoa
  • 1/2 cup spinach, finely diced
  • 1/4 cup mushrooms, finely diced
  • 1 tbsp garlic
  • 2 tsp olive oil

Instructions

  1. Core tomatoes, removing the inside flesh and seeds. Set aside the inside flesh from 2 of the tomatoes in a medium bowl.
  2. Dice the remaining tomato flesh. Add to a bowl with the quinoa, spinach, mushrooms, garlic and olive oil. Mix well to combine.
  3. Place tomatoes in a shallow pan. Stuff the tomatoes with the quinoa and vegetable mixture.
  4. Bake in the oven at 350 degrees for 25 minutes, until tomato begins to soften.
  5. Serve as a side dish, or make it a meal by adding a fried egg on top.

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Supermarket RD’s Pick: Suzie’s Quinoa

Need a simple solution to add whole grains to your day? With only 60 seconds, Suzie’s Quinoa pouches make it easier to make healthy choices, making it this week’s Supermarket RD’s Pick

Supermarket RD's Pick - Dietitian approved items that you can find in the grocery store! #rdchat
In the latest issue of Food & Nutrition Magazine, was a great article about 17 Glorious Grains You Need to Know. The opening paragraph states:

The USDA’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that half of all grains consumed be whole grains, and while most Americans still fail to meet this goal, we are moving in the right direction. In fact, 70 percent of respondents to a 2015 survey said they were trying to consume more whole grains.”

It’s fantastic to hear that 70% of those surveyed were trying to consume more whole grains. I loved this article from Food & Nutrition Magazine, because it showcases a variety of whole grains. What I see too often, is that consumers rely on whole-wheat bread as their main source of whole grains. I love that consumers are opting for whole wheat bread, but there are so many other whole grains to try to incorporate into a healthy diet.
With these various whole grains, brings additional nutrition benefit, including a higher fiber and protein content.
Some whole grains to take a little longer to cook. Why? Because in whole grains the bran, germ, and endosperm are in tact and it may take a little longer for the liquid to absorb during the cooking process for a tender kernel.
When time is not on your side, whole grains are getting a lot easier, which leads into my Supermarket RD’s Pick: Suzie’s Quinoa.
Supermarket RD's Pick: Suzie's Quinoa via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchenHeat it in the microwave for 60 seconds if eating hot, or simply tear open the bag and eat it cold – Suzie’s Quinoa is fully cooked and ready to eat.
If you are starting to venture out and try new whole grains, start with quinoa. I’m sure you’ve heard of it by now! Pronounced “keen-wah”, this whole grain with a slight nutty flavor, contains all nine essential amino acids and provides 8 grams of protein and 7 grams of fiber per serving. Suzie’s Quinoa with olive oil contains three simple ingredients: precooked quinoa, olive oil, & salt.

The pre-cooked packages make it so easy! Add as a side dish for dinner, top salad with quinoa for lunch, or even use for a filling for stuffed peppers!
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Disclosure: Good Groceries Company did not sponsor this post. All thoughts and opinions are my own to share healthy items found in your grocery store to RDelicious Kitchen readers.

Apple Walnut Buckwheat Pancakes

Apple picking season is here and these Apple Walnut Buckwheat Pancakes should definitely be on the menu this weekend.

Apple Walnut Buckwheat Pancakes via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchenBefore we chat pancakes, let’s talk apples. I know on instagram, I’ve already dove into the pumpkin obsession and I am not even ashamed #basic, but I don’t want to leave apple season in the dust.
However in the technology world, Apple has not been my friend. This past week, my macbook pro charger cord frayed and I was computer-less for a few days until I was able to get to the apple store to get a new one. But then Labor Day weekend rolled around and I wanted to stay “unplugged” to really enjoy a weekend off.
Apple Walnut Buckwheat Pancakes via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen
In case you popped over to find a new recipe and didn’t get your fix, with my computer being out of commission these past few days, don’t worry.. the days I wasn’t posting, I was cooking up a storm, so I have a lot of new recipes coming your way!
Any just to keep you in the loop, RDelicious Kitchen is now on Yummly! I added a new button on the bottom of each post where you now can “Yum” my recipes. Yummly is kind of like Pinterest on steroids because when you sign up, you can fill out your taste preferences to include/exclude foods based on what you do or don’t want. When you “yum” a recipe it gets saved to your recipe box. It’s perfect for someone like me who likes to keep my recipes organized, but now virtually.
You can go to Yummly to set up an account for free and start yumming recipes from here or visit my Yummly profile! I’m very new to Yummly and still learning about it, but I hope you’ll join me!
Apple Walnut Buckwheat Pancakes via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen
Before you scroll down straight to the recipe, I still need to tell you about these pancakes! I’ve had this Hodgson Mill buckwheat pancakes sitting in my pantry for awhile now. Every weekend, I always had plans to make pancakes, but honestly pancakes are not part of my top breakfast food choices. Okay, okay, before you glare through your computer screen at me, let me explain! I love pancakes, but I always felt that sugar crash after having a pancake breakfast.
Apple Walnut Buckwheat Pancakes via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen
But these aren’t your average pancakes. With whole grains, like buckwheat, it packs in plenty of fiber to keep you full and maintain energy levels. Plus, the addition of apples (more fiber!) and walnuts (healthy fats and protein!) makes it a more balanced breakfast.
Apple Walnut Buckwheat Pancakes via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchenSo, boost up the pancake mix in your pantry with this new twist!

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buckwheat apple pancakes stacked on a white plate

Apple Walnut Buckwheat Pancakes

  • Author: Julie @ RDelicious Kitchen
  • Yield: 4 1x

Scale

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup Hodgson Mills Buckwheat Pancake Mix
  • 1/3 cup milk
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts
  • 1 apple, peeled and diced
  • 2 tbsp cinnamon
  • optional: syrup

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, mix together pancake mix, milk, egg, applesauce, walnuts, diced apples, and cinnamon.
  2. In a large skillet coated with cooking spray over medium heat, scoop about 1/4 cup of batter into the pan for each pancake. Wait until the edges begin to bubble, then flip and cook until pancake is cooked through. Repeat until all batter is used.
  3. Stack the pancakes and top with additional walnuts, apple slices, and syrup if desired. Enjoy!

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