6 Ways to Pack a More Eco-Friendly Lunch

Back to school or back to the office, many of us pack lunches for our busy days. If you are taking the step to packing yourself a healthful lunch, take it a step further with these 6 strategies to pack it in a more eco-friendly way.

Power Your Lunchbox

This post has been sponsored by Produce for Kids. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands that keep this website running!

Produce for Kids’ Power Your Lunchbox initiative is helping families with ideas, tips, recipes, and more to help you eat more nutritious and delicious lunches – at school or the office. Since launching in 2014, Power Your Lunchbox has provided more than 1.3 million meals to families in need through Feeding America thanks to their amazing partners.

Whether you are looking for make-ahead ideas, hot lunches, non-sandwich ideas, Produce for Kids has many recipe ideas to look through.

Rethink the way you pack your lunch to help reduce environmental impact every day, all school year long. Here are some ways to pack a more eco-friendly lunch.

Start with taking inventory

Each day your child might come home with an empty lunchbox, but do you know how much of your kid’s lunches actually ends up in the trash? Surprisingly a lot. Most statistics reported about school lunches are from the food served by the cafeteria, but even those who pack lunch, that food may end up in the trash.

Have a conversation with your children to bring home anything they don’t eat during lunch. Instead of tossing it, encourage them to bring home the half-eaten muffin or the pear with only a few bites taken out of it. This way you can understand how much your child is really eating, to help pack accordingly, to pack as leftovers the next day or an after school snack and strategize with the tips below to prevent food waste, which in turn can help you save money.

Skip individually wrapped foods

This not only can cut down on food waste but can help add a little more variety to your child’s lunchbox. Scoop out a portion of yogurt vs. packing the whole container. Children like variety so having a little bit of a few items vs. just a couple of larger packed items can also provide a more balanced lunch. Packing lunch for 2 kids? Split an orange and granola bar between two lunch boxes instead of packing a whole one of each for both.

plastic bento box lunch with mini muffins
Image via Produce for Kids

Utilize reusable sandwich bags and containers.

From bento boxes to stasher bags, and all the different kinds of plastic or glass containers in between there are plenty of ways to replace the single-use plastic baggies. For sandwiches, utilize stasher bags or Bees Wrap, reusable wrapper made from beeswax to allow you to get rid of the ziplock and saran wrap for good.

Pack a water bottle and beverages

Packing a reusable water bottle is a simple solution to reducing plastic waste. Reuseable water bottles come in all different sizes to fit into any lunchbox. Have separate bottles for juice, milk, or other beverages to pack.

Did their water bottle go to school with them but never made it home? Add a label with your child’s name and classroom teacher’s name so it will find its way home the next day.

bento box lunch with sandwich skewers

Make things “fast food”

School lunchtime may be 30 minutes in some schools, but a lot of that time is socializing and waiting at the door to get to recess. Change the term fast food into a new meaning by helping save time in the cafeteria. Peel the clementine or cut the sandwich into bite-size pieces. Be creative and use fun shaped cookie cutters to make different bite-size shapes. This can help with packing them the right portion size for them and see how much of each item tends to come home the most often.

Compost

Many schools have started a compost program at their schools to help teach students about avoiding food waste while giving back to the soil, plus providing a medium for many environmental and science-related topics for
discovery along with opportunities for student development.

Do you compost at home? Bring the peach pits or orange peels home to compost later.

Need some more lunchbox inspiration? Follow #PowerYourLunch for creative ideas.

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Other School Lunch Topics

Tips to Encourage Kids to Try New Foods

Kids Eat Right Month, celebrated each August, focuses on the importance of healthful eating and active lifestyles for kids and families.

small child reaching on the counter for a strawberry

This time last year I was just wrapping up my kids’ culinary camp which turned a few picky eaters into food explorers. While I do not have kids myself (just yet! .. well does a fur child count?) I love working with children introducing them to new foods and help them find joy in cooking.

I chatted with a few friends with young children about their strategies of ways to encourage their children with trying new foods.

small child eating zucchini noodles
(image via Stephanie Corbo)

Take your kids grocery shopping

Previously working as a retail dietitian, I would encourage this with parents and caregivers all the time. Just simply getting them involved in the process of grocery shopping and seeing there are so many different kinds of food available is a good start.

Emily Kyle, RDN, CLT, HCP, holistic health & wellness + cannabis educator of Emily Kyle Nutrition, turned the chore of grocery shopping with her son into “Friday Night Date Night”. They enjoy dinner & free live music in the cafe of Wegmans before going grocery shopping. She says this is helpful for so many reasons because, “We’re not hungry when we go shopping, it is later at night so the store is not busy when we do shop, and he gets to enjoy the experience and turn it from something stressful or rushed to something mindful and fun.”

Jessica Levinson, RD, culinary nutrition expert of jessicalevinson.com and mom of 7-year-old twin girls, admits when she takes her girls shopping, “it’s fun and sometimes infuriating.”

I get it .. sometimes you just want to get the chore of food shopping out of the way for the busy week ahead, but at other times encourage your kids to join you. Taking your kids shopping gives them an opportunity to see and learn about a wider variety of foods than just what comes home with you. Plus, it’s a great opportunity to spend time together, talk about healthy foods, where food comes from, and may even help motivate a picky eater to try something new.

Let them pick out their own items

Levinson and her girls work off her grocery list but also welcome them to pick out anything from the produce section that they want to try. She said, “In other parts of the store if they find items they want to try we will look them over together to read the labels, check out the ingredients, and determine if it’s a product that belongs in our house.” which is a great time for gentle nutrition education.

Sara Haas, RD, culinary dietitian of sarahaas.com heads to the produce department with her daughter. She says, “I always ask her about what produce she wants as well as snacks. She picks and we look at it together to decide if it’s something we need.”

Kyle also stops in the produce aisle as well and encourages her son to pick the “Produce Pick of the Week”. She notes, “This has enhanced his ability to identify and recognize a wide variety of produce, and encouraged him to be brave and try new things. We’ve tried everything from dragon fruit to papaya, bok choy, and rainbow carrots. It’s a fun reward for him and a good habit for me to instill in him.”

Diana Rice, RD of The Baby Steps Dietitian and lactation counselor, has fun seeing what items her kids gravitate toward in the produce department. Rice says it helps inspire her to even try something new. “When I’m on my own, I usually just pick up the same old produce items that are easy to prep and I know the whole family likes. My kids inspire me to try something new!”

Go on a scavenger hunt in the store

Use your grocery list or even a recipe to have your helpers find the items in the store. This keeps them busy but also helpful within the process. If hunting for ingredients for a recipe, have them help you make that recipe from all the ingredients they found.

mom with child dressed as a chef
(image via @emilykylenutrition)

Cook together

Having your children help you prepare family meals is one of the most effective ways to encourage them to try new foods and improve their overall diet quality, both now and later in life.

In March, the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior published the results of a 10-year longitudinal study conducted by researchers at the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health. The aim of the study, which tracked more than 1,100 participants, was to answer a simple question: Can knowing how to cook as a young person lead to healthier eating practices in adulthood? The researchers arrived at a compelling—if unsurprising—conclusion: It can. (source)

.. with ingredients, you may not even like yourself

What if there are certain foods as a parent or caregiver do you not like yourself?

Stephanie Corbo, a middle school teacher and mom of two (and one of my best friends!), encourages her children to try whatever they are interested in trying. She says, “If they want to try an ingredient or food, I would never stand in their way from exploring new flavors.”

Levinson notes that she personally does not enjoy bananas but doesn’t discourage her children from enjoying them. She says, “Just because I don’t care for something doesn’t mean my children shouldn’t be exposed to it and determine for themselves if they like it. Role modeling is so important when feeding kids, and showing them that I’ll cook something even if I don’t like is part of that modeling.”

Rice doesn’t currently have that issue as there isn’t many foods she personally dislikes, but notes if that does come up in the future, she said, “if they came to love something that’s not my favorite somehow, I would try to regularly incorporate it. It’s important to respect their preferences. I think it’s also important to demonstrate that it’s okay to not like a food. So just like they have foods they don’t prefer, I think they would enjoy knowing that something is ‘not mommy’s favorite’.” 

child's hand spreading peanut butter on whole wheat toast
(image via @dianakrice)

Let them choose

Keep them involved in the conversation. From experience in my kids cooking classes, I found the more they are involved in the choices, the more likely they were to enjoy it. Produce for Kids has really great resources to support these efforts.

With school starting the thought of packing lunches can be stressful, but if they have a chart to choose from, they get the choice of what they will have packed and as the parent or caregiver takes some of the stress away of figure out what to pack.

young girl eating whole wheat spaghetti
(image via @jlevinsonrd)

Keep introducing the same food in new ways

Levinson’s girls are very familiar with the concept that it takes 15-20 tries to make a real decision about a food. While Rice agrees to the 15-20 range she also notes it can take longer.

Need help keeping track of the new foods you are introducing? Utilize this Food Exposure Chart.

I personally like to introduce a new food in multiple ways. In one of my classes, we cooked cauliflower in five different ways. It was interesting to see how the taste and texture preferences between the children varied drastically, but at the end of the day, they were all enjoying cauliflower at least one way.

Corbo notes she is blessed to have two kids who are not picky eaters, eating everything from lobster to hot dogs. She notes, “I’ve found that if I make eating fun, they’re more willing to try new things. My husband makes all sorts of vehicle noises as he spirals the fork through the air, and the kids love it.”

As a recipe developer, Haas is always whipping up new recipes in the kitchen. Her daughter will try just about everything, which Haas thinks is awesome. She wants her to know as much about food as she can. And all aspects of it too!

Kyle explains to her son how much her own taste buds have changed throughout her lifetime, and provide examples, so he knows that his tastes will change over time too.


Every family is different and everyone’s tastes buds are different. Utilize these strategies and tweak them to work best for you and your family. Have fun cooking and trying new foods together!

Greek-Style Lamb Pita with Tzatziki Sauce

Do you cook with lamb? If you are new to cooking with lamb try starting with ground lamb and this Greek-Style Lamb Pita with Tzatziki Sauce. Lamb offers a protein-packed, flavorful alternative to the typical protein sources, like beef, chicken or turkey.

lamb meatballs in a pita

I had the wonderful opportunity to travel to the Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane University a few months ago. When I was there, I was immersed with information, learning all about pasture-raised lamb, butchery, and cooking techniques for lamb with Nourish with Lamb.

Lamb is pasture-raised

Instead of being called a rancher, those who raise lamb are known as Shepards. Have you ever cooked with or prepared lamb? Lamb might seem intimidating if you’ve never worked with before, but this lean protein pairs well with global flavors and can be used in a variety of dishes.

raw ingredients of lamb meatballs in a clear bowl on a marble slab

Ground lamb is typically made from the shoulder and is incredibly moist and flavorful. Lamb is delicious in meatloaf, shepherd’s pie, tacos, casseroles, stews, lamb burgers, or in this case meatballs for pitas.

 Greek-Style Lamb Pita with Tzatziki Sauce on a white plate

Did you know?

Lean lamb is a source of healthy, unsaturated fats. Nearly 40% of the fat in lean lamb is heart-healthy monounsaturated fat. On average, a 3-ounce serving of lamb is lean and has only 150 calories. Lean cuts include the leg and loin.

Greek pita with a side salad on a white plate
Lamb's Fatty Acid Breakdown
(source: Nourish with Lamb)

Lamb Fits in the Traditional Mediterranean Diet

The 2015 Dietary Guidelines gives special recognition to the Mediterranean dietary pattern for its healthful eating approach. Lamb is a staple protein in a healthy Mediterranean-style diet, particularly in Greek cuisine. Lamb is nutrient-rich and on average, it’s an excellent source of protein, vitamin B12, niacin, zinc, and selenium and a good source of iron and riboflavin.

This pita with tzatziki sauce is a way to start on the path to a Mediterranean-style diet.

Greek stuffed pita with meatballs
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Lamb meatballs in a pita on a white plate

Greek-Style Lamb Pita with Tzatziki Sauce

  • Author: Chef Julie Harrington, RD
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings 1x
  • Category: Entree
  • Cuisine: Greek

Scale

Ingredients

For the Tzatziki Sauce:

6 ounces plain Greek yogurt
1/2 cup seedless cucumber, peeled and finely chopped
1 tablespoon fresh dill, finely chopped
1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
salt, to taste

For the Lamb Meatballs:

1 pound ground lamb
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion, finely chopped
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
1 tablespoon lemon zest
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or more if more heat is desired

For the Pitas:

4 whole grain pita pockets, warmed
1/2 cup grape tomatoes, halved
1/2 cup seedless cucumber, chopped
2 cups lettuce, chopped


Instructions

For the Tzatziki Sauce: In a small bowl, combine yogurt, cucumber, dill, and red wine vinegar. Season with salt, to taste. Set aside.

For the Meatballs: Preheat the oven to 400°F. Place a wire rack on a sheet pan. Set aside. In a large bowl, combine lamb, garlic, parsley, lemon zest, salt, pepper, and cayenne pepper. Mix well to combine. Form small meatballs and place on the wire rack. Bake for 20-30 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 165°F. (cook time will vary depending on how large the meatballs are)

To assemble: In a pita pocket stuff pockets with lettuce, cucumber, and tomatoes. Add a smear of Tzatziki sauce and 3-4 meatballs per pita. 


Notes

Meal prep tip: Make a double batch of these meatballs and freeze for later. 

Keywords: lamb, sauce, Tzatziki, Greek

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Steel Cut Oats vs. Rolled Oats vs. Quick Oats – What’s the Difference?

February is Heart Health Month and oats have a stellar reputation for their heart health benefit. Do you know the difference between each variety of oats?

variety of oats in steel measuring cups

Fiber’s role in heart health

Dietary fiber can help improve blood cholesterol levels and lower your risk of heart disease, stroke, obesity and even type 2 diabetes.

The American Heart Association recommends that at least half of the grains you eat be whole grains. Eating whole grains (like oats) are consistently associated with a reduced risk of chronic disease, including cardiovascular disease. Whole grain oats and oat bran can help lower blood cholesterol thanks to the power of beta-glucan – a soluble fiber, largely unique to oats, that basically tells your liver to pull LDL cholesterol out of the blood. Then, it binds to some of the cholesterol in your gut, keeping it from ever reaching your bloodstream.

You head to the grocery store to pick up oats, and there are so many options. Steel-cut oats, rolled oats, old-fashioned oats – what’s the difference?

different variety of oats on a wooden board

Steel Cut Oats

steel cut oats in a metal measuring cup

Steel-cut oats, also known as Irish or Scottish oats, are oats that are processed by chopping the whole oat groat into several pieces. This type of oatmeal takes the longest to cook. Why? Because the outside layer of the whole grain, the bran, is fully intact. A longer cook time penetrates through the bran creating tender, yet a chewy texture that retains much of its shape even after cooking.

Don’t have time in the morning to cook steel-cut oats? I don’t blame you! Prepare them in advance by cooking them over the stovetop, in a crockpot, or Instant Pot. Or try my frozen muffin tin method.

Get the recipe: Frozen (Single Serving) Pumpkin Steel Cut Oatmeal

Rolled Oats

rolled oats in a metal measursing cup

Rolled oats, also known as old-fashioned oats, are created when oat groats are steamed and then rolled into flakes. This process stabilizes the healthy oils in the oats, so they stay fresh longer, and helps the oats cook faster, by creating a greater surface area.

Rolled oats cook faster than steel-cut oats. They absorb more liquid and hold their shape well during cooking. With their faster cook time, enjoy a bowl of warm oatmeal in the morning or use in recipes like muffins, granola, pancakes, or other baked good recipes.

Get the recipe: Quinoa Oatmeal with Berries

Quick Oats

quick oats in a metal measuring cup

Quick oats, also known as minute oats or instant oats are rolled oats and that are steamed for even longer. As the most processed type of oat, instant oatmeal cooks in seconds and has a smooth, creamy, and soft consistency and mild flavor.

Quick cook more quickly than steel-cut or rolled oats, but retain less of their texture, and often cook up mushy. Plus, be mindful of the multiple varieties of quick oats in the shelf. Tip: Opt for the quick oats in the canister vs. the individual packets. Not only will you save money, but often the packets contain disodium phosphate (aka. salt), to help them swell even faster in the microwave, whereas the canister contains just the oats. Additionally, the packets contain added sugar, if choosing the flavored varieties.

Get the recipe: Apple Pie Overnight Oats

oatmeal with strawberries and raspberries in a white bowl

New Research

Consuming uncooked oats, like overnight oats that are soaked in milk or yogurt to soften, contain resistant starch. Resistant starch is a carbohydrate that resists digestion in the small intestine and ferments in the large intestine. As the fibers ferment they act as a prebiotic and feed the good bacteria in the gut.

The John Hopkins Patient Guide to Diabetes notes that “When starches are digested they typically break down into glucose. Because resistant starch is not digested in the small intestine, it doesn’t raise glucose. Gut health is improved as fermentation in the large intestine makes more good bacteria and less bad bacteria in the gut. Healthy gut bacteria can improve glycemic control. Other benefits of resistant starch include increased feeling of fullness, treatment and prevention of constipation, decrease in cholesterol, and lower risk of colon cancer. Resistant starch is fermented slowly so it causes less gas than other fibers.”

This post may contain affiliate links. To find out more information, please read my disclosure statement.

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The Best Foods to Eat Before Bed for a Better Night’s Sleep

Everyone could use more sleep. In fact, nearly half of American adults don’t get the recommended seven to nine hours a night. Sleep has a huge effect on our overall mental and physical health, as well as our digestion, metabolism, and weight, so it’s critical to make sure you’re fitting it in. Learn how certain foods can help with a better night’s sleep

glass of milk with almonds

Eat for better sleep

Luckily, there are a lot of natural sleep enhancers in food— tasty food! Melatonin, magnesium and potassium-heavy snacks help your body get back on a healthy sleep schedule by relaxing your muscles and mind enough to drift off. Here’s a guide to the foods to snack on, and to limit, before going to sleep to ensure you get the rest your body craves.

Eat for Better Sleep Infographic

There are a lot of tasty recipes that incorporate some of these foods. To fit in some sleep-inspired protein and whole grains, try my Turkey Burger or Squash & Wheat Berry Salad recipes. Both make healthy, filling dinners that also prep your body for a good night’s sleep.

Confetti Turkey Burger Recipe

If you’re like many others, however, you might need some more heavy-duty lifestyle updates to get better sleep. A healthier daily diet can eliminate nighttime disturbances such as indigestion or nausea, so it’s most important to maintain healthy eating throughout the entire day. Also consider, however, updating your bedroom: soft pillows and a mattress made of foam can help your muscles relax, allowing you to stay asleep for longer. Similarly, a cool bedroom temperature and breathable, cotton sheets can avoid sweaty nights and boost your overall sleep quality.

wooden bedside table with a floral arrangement and candle

With just a few changes to your diet, you can make a huge difference in your sleep routine and overall health. Whether it’s a new bedtime snack or a complete lifestyle overhaul, you should do whatever you can to get more sleep. The extra energy it brings could not only make you feel more ready for the day but could also inspire you to begin taking better care of yourself in all regards.

What other strategies do you implement in your daily routine for a better night’s sleep?

Cookbook Gift Guide

Give the gift of new recipe ideas for your foodie loving family members and friends. I am sharing some of my favorite cookbooks in my Cookbook Gift Guide. I am very excited to share so many cookbooks from my fellow dietitian colleagues that are not only packed with delicious recipes but also nutrition education.

For more foodie inspired gift ideas, head over to my shop page!

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks
Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

Plenty More

Yotam Ottolenghi is one of the world’s most beloved culinary talents. In this follow-up to his bestselling Plenty, he continues to explore the diverse realm of vegetarian food with a wholly original approach. Organized by cooking method, more than 150 dazzling recipes emphasize spices, seasonality, and bold flavors. From inspired salads to hearty main dishes and luscious desserts, Plenty More: Vibrant Vegetable Cooking from London’s Ottolenghi’s a must-have for vegetarians and omnivores alike. This visually stunning collection will change the way you cook and eat vegetables

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

You Have It Made

Ellie KriegerNew York Times best-selling and multi-award-winning author, has written a cookbook devoted to the kind of recipes that her fans have been waiting for—make-ahead meals. For those who are always short on time when it comes to cooking, Ellie is here to help. Her recipes—which include breakfast bakes, soups, salads, casseroles, and more—can all be prepared ahead of time, making putting food on the table that much easier. Each recipe includes instructions for refrigerating and/or freezing as well as storing and reheating directions. With exciting dishes like the Pumpkin Spice Overnight Oats in Jars and the Herbed Salmon Salad, you’ll be able to have meals ready days in advance. As with her other books, all of Ellie’s recipes are healthy and come complete with nutrition information. But that doesn’t mean they sound like diet food! Just look at the Creamy Tomato Soup, Chicken Enchilada Pie, and Smoky Smothered Pork Chops, to name a few. You Have It Made helps you turn your fridge and freezer into a treasure chest of satisfying, good-for-you meals.

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

Momofuku

Never before has there been a phenomenon like Momofuku. A once-unrecognizable word, it’s now synonymous with the award-winning restaurants of the same name in New York City (Momofuku Noodle Bar, Ssäm Bar, Ko, Má Pêche, Fuku, Nishi, and Milk Bar), Toronto, and Sydney. Chef David Chang single-handedly revolutionized cooking in America and beyond with his use of bold Asian flavors and impeccable ingredients, his mastery of the humble ramen noodle, and his thorough devotion to pork.  

Chang relays with candor the tale of his unwitting rise to superstardom, which, though wracked with mishaps, happened at light speed. And the dishes shared in this book are coveted by all who’ve dined—or yearned to—at any Momofuku location (yes, the pork buns are here). This is a must-read for anyone who truly enjoys food!

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

The Mindful Glow Cookbook

In over 100 recipes, Abbey Sharp, of Abbey’s Kitchen,  shows us how she eats: healthy and nourishing meals that are packed with flavor like PB & J Protein Pancakes, Autumn Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese, Stuffed Hawaiian Burgers, Chicken, Sweet Potato and Curry Cauliflower, Chocolate Stout Veggie Chili, Chewy Crackle Almond Apple Cookies, and Ultimate Mini Sticky Toffee Puddings. Many of her recipes are plant-centric and free of dairy, gluten, and nuts. Others contain some protein-rich, lean beef, poultry, eggs, and dairy, so there are plenty of delicious recipes for everyone and every occasion. 
Featuring gorgeous photography throughout, The Mindful Glow Cookbook is perfect for anyone looking to fully nourish their body, satisfy food cravings, and enjoy every snack, meal, and decadent dessert in blissful enjoyment.

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

Thug Kitchen

Thug Kitchen lives in the real world. In their first cookbook, they’re throwing down more than 100 recipes for their best-loved meals, snacks and sides for beginning cooks to home chefs. (Roasted Beer and Lime Cauliflower Tacos? Pumpkin Chili? Grilled Peach Salsa? Believe that sh*t.) Plus they’re going to arm you with all the info and techniques you need to shop on a budget and go and kick a bunch of ass on your own.

This book is an invitation to everyone who wants to do better to elevate their kitchen game. No more ketchup and pizza counting as vegetables. No more drive-thru lines. No more avoiding the produce corner of the supermarket. Sh*t is about to get real.

Note Thug Kitchen freely drops the f-bomb, so gift wisely. 

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

The 30-Minute Mediterranean Diet Cookbook

The 30-Minute Mediterranean Diet Cookbook, written by Deanna Segrave-Daly, RD and Serena Ball, MS, RD of Teaspoon of Spice, offers fresh, flavorful, and FAST recipes for lifelong health.

Bowls of pasta, abundant seafood, roasted vegetables, bread dipped into olive oil, and even a glass of wine―the Mediterranean diet is easy to follow because it’s also a lifestyle. The 30-Minute Mediterranean Diet Cookbook makes it easier than ever to get your fill of the Mediterranean diet and all of its health benefits with quick, satisfying recipes for health and longevity.

Table-ready in 30 minutes or less, these classic Mediterranean diet meals combine easy-to-find ingredients with quick prep and cook times, so that you can spend less time in the kitchen and more time enjoying your food. From Breakfast Bruschetta to Baked Chicken Caprese to Chilled Dark Chocolate Fruit, The 30-Minute Mediterranean Diet Cookbook makes the Mediterranean diet a staple for everyday schedules.

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

The Pescatarian Cookbook

The Pescatarian Cookbook, written by Cara Harbstreet, MS, RD, LD, of Streetsmart Nutrition, is the definitive kitchen companion to the pescatarian diet with fundamental information, recipes, and healthy meal plans.

Rich in fish and seafood, hearty vegetables, and wholesome grains―pescatarianism is a varied and balanced diet. The Pescatarian Cookbook is a complete reference to reap all benefits of this naturally nutritious diet with essential information, recipes, and healthy meal plans.

From Zucchini Pancakes with Smoked Salmon for breakfast to Grilled Swordfish with Chimichurri and Roasted Vegetables for dinner, this pescatarian cookbook offers perfectly portioned pescatarian plates for every meal. Complete with 3 weeks’ worth of meal plans―that include shopping lists and tips for meal prep―The Pescatarian Cookbook is your go-to reference to make the pescatarian diet a sustainable and satisfying lifestyle.

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

Taco! Taco! Taco!:

Make every day Taco Tuesday! Tacos are the perfect food–uniquely versatile and incredibly delicious! Taco! Taco! Taco!, written by Sara Haas, RDN, LDN, features 100 taco recipes that are as easy to prepare as they are to love.

Who doesn’t like tacos? Simple to make, tacos can be prepared in many different ways, and provide the ideal platform for tons of nourishing foods. Taco! Taco! Taco! features 100 taco recipes, each providing delicious and fun ideas for your next meal. 

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

The 30-Minute Thyroid Cookbook

The 30-Minute Thyroid Cookbook, written by Emily Kyle, MS, RDN, CDN, CLT, offers the fastest, everyday recipes to take control of hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s symptoms for long-term relief.

When you’re dealing with symptom flare-ups, the last thing you want to do is spend hours cooking. The 30-Minute Thyroid Cookbook offers quick recipe solutions to manage hypothyroid and Hashimoto’s symptoms, so that you can get in and out of the kitchen and back to your life.

From Crispy Baked Tempeh Fingers to Rub Roasted Pork Tenderloin, these no-fuss recipes combine quick and easy prep and cook times for table-ready meals in 30-minutes or less. Complete with a guide to setting up a thyroid-friendly kitchen, plus tons of tips and tricks to make home cooking easier, The 30-Minute Thyroid Cookbook is an everyday solution to get long-term symptom relief.

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

The Protein-Packed Breakfast Club

Whether for weight loss, managing prediabetes or Type II diabetes, or a healthy, fit lifestyle, The Protein-Packed Breakfast Club, written by Lauren Harris-Pincus, MS, RDN is filled with delicious, easy to make recipes containing 300 calories or less and packed with a minimum of 20 grams of protein. Power up your morning with protein! You’ll find recipes featuring dairy, protein powders, nuts, seeds, eggs and ancient grains including hot trends like overnight oats, smoothie bowls and mug cakes. Discover healthier versions of classics like pancakes and French toast. Many recipes are also vegetarian and gluten free. In a hurry in the morning? Don’t worry! Prepare your breakfast in the evening or on the weekend to save precious time during the morning rush while ensuring you begin the day with an energizing, protein-packed breakfast!

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

The 28 Day DASH Diet Weight Loss Program

Achieve your weight loss goals with the comprehensive diet and exercise plan from The 28-Day DASH Diet Weight-Loss Program, co-authored by Andy De Santis, RD, MPH, and Julie Andrews, MS, RDN, CD.

The DASH diet offers a path to weight loss that is rooted in balanced eating, but it’s not the only key to your success. The 28-Day DASH Diet Weight-Loss Program offers a holistic diet and lifestyle plan to help you achieve your weight loss goals for long-term health.

The 28-Day DASH Diet Weight-Loss Program begins by tackling critical lifestyle components for good health with guidance for exercise routines, stress management, and a good night’s sleep. With a 28-day meal plan that includes trackers to monitor habits and exercise, this book kick-starts weight loss and sets you on a path of long-term health.

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

Whole Cooking and Nutrition

Enough of the dieting and deprivation! It’s time to embrace the joy of eating well with the intention that healthy foods are nourishing, sustaining and delicious. Whole Cooking and Nutrition, written by Katie Cavuto, MS, RD, RYT, shifts the conversation away from dieting to one of positive messages and gratifying intentions. The result is a book packed with information to help readers improve their relationship with food, turning a spotlight on 85 everyday foods that maximize flavor and boast rich nutrient density that will inspire you to live a healthy lifestyle! With more than 150 vibrant, flavorful recipes, this cookbook promotes a mindful, pleasurable approach to eating.

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

Fertility Foods

A complete dietary program for women seeking a healthy pregnancy. Created by RDN certified experts, Liz Shaw, RD and Sara Haas, RDN, LDN, Fertility Foods provides you with powerful nutritional benefits and more than 100 recipes.

Struggling with infertility can be one of the most frustrating experiences for women looking to conceive. Rather than juggle multiple prescription medications all while scheduling an endless series of doctors’ visits, Fertility Foods helps you to seek better results—just by changing your diet!

As you prepare to enter one of the most significant times in your life, you owe it to yourself and your future children to make sure that your body has absolutely everything it needs, at the proper times and in the proper quantities. Fertility Foods is more than just a diet plan or cookbook, with over 100 nutritious, satisfying dishes to boost your fertility. It’s a companion, a constant support providing you with the information you need to ensure you receive proper nutrition before conception.

Beyond Cookbooks

Moving beyond your traditional cookbook filled with delicious recipes, I also really love these educational books, which are perfect for anyone who loves to cook. From food pairings to food science, these additional books will be a great gift for your foodie loving family members and friends.

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

The Spice Companion

A stunning and definitive spice guide by the country’s most sought-after expert, with hundreds of fresh ideas and tips for using pantry spices, 102 never-before-published recipes for spice blends, gorgeous photography, and botanical illustrations.

Since founding his spice shop in 2006, Lior Lev Sercarz has become the go-to source for fresh and unusual spices as well as small-batch custom blends for renowned chefs around the world. The Spice Companion communicates his expertise in a way that will change how readers cook, inspiring them to try bold new flavor combinations and make custom spice blends. For each of the 102 curated spices, Lev Sercarz provides the history and origin, information on where to buy and how to store it, five traditional cuisine pairings, three quick suggestions for use (such as adding cardamom to flavor chicken broth), and a unique spice blend recipe to highlight it in the kitchen.

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

The Food Lab

Ever wondered how to pan-fry a steak with a charred crust and an interior that’s perfectly medium-rare from edge to edge when you cut into it? How to make homemade mac ‘n’ cheese that is as satisfyingly gooey and velvety-smooth as the blue box stuff, but far tastier? How to roast a succulent, moist turkey (forget about brining!)―and use a foolproof method that works every time?

As Serious Eats’s culinary nerd-in-residence, J. Kenji López-Alt has pondered all these questions and more. In The Food Lab, Kenji focuses on the science behind beloved American dishes, delving into the interactions between heat, energy, and molecules that create great food. Kenji shows that often, conventional methods don’t work that well, and home cooks can achieve far better results using new―but simple―techniques. In hundreds of easy-to-make recipes with over 1,000 full-color images, you will find out how to make foolproof Hollandaise sauce in just two minutes, how to transform one simple tomato sauce into a half-dozen dishes, how to make the crispiest, creamiest potato casserole ever conceived, and much more.

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

The Vegetarian Flavor Bible

Throughout time people have chosen to adopt a vegetarian or vegan diet for a variety of reasons from ethics to economy to personal and planetary well-being Experts now suggest a new reason for doing so maximizing flavor – which is too often masked by meat-based stocks or butter and cream The Vegetarian Flavor Bible is an essential guide to culinary creativity based on insights from dozens of leading American chefs representing plant-based whole foods including vegetables fruits grains legumes nuts and seeds the book provides an A-to-Z listing of hundreds of ingredients from acai to zucchini blossoms cross-referenced with the herbs spices and other seasonings that best enhance their flavor resulting in thousands of recommended pairings The Vegetarian Flavor Bible is the ideal reference for the way millions of people cook and eat today- vegetarians vegans and omnivores alike. This groundbreaking book will empower both home cooks and professional chefs to create more compassionate healthful and flavorful cuisine.

Cookbook Gift Guide: A roundup of culinary and nutrition cookbooks and culinary education books that any foodie family member or friend will love! Cookbooks recommendations hand selected from Chef Julie Harrington, RD @ChefJulie_RD #cookbook #cooking #gift #giftguide #culinarynutrition #cookingtips #nutrition #healthycookbooks

52-Week Meal Planner

The 52-Week Meal Planner, created byhttps://jessicalevinson.com/ Jessica Levinson, MS, RDN, CDN, is your complete companion to master meal planning with menus, grocery lists, recipe pages, and more.

A well-made meal planner guarantees that hectic schedules don’t get in the way of healthy meals. More effective than a pen and paper, the 52-Week Meal Planner provides the tools you need to map out exactly how you’re going to shop, cook, and eat, week after week.

This handy meal planner features one year’s worth of weekly templates to plan breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks. With grocery lists, price comparison sheets, and recipe pages, the 52-Week Meal Planner is an all-in-one guide to take control of what you eat and how much time and money you spend.

This post contains affiliate links, to find out more information, please read my disclosure statement.

Kids in the Kitchen: Becoming a Food Explorer

New research suggests that learning how to cook as a young person leads to better eating practices—and better health—later in life.

Kids in the Kitchen: Becoming Food Explorers by Chef Julie Harrington, RD @chefjulie_rd

In March, the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior published the results of a 10-year longitudinal study conducted by researchers at the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health. The aim of the study, which tracked more than 1,100 participants, was to answer a simple question: Can knowing how to cook as a young person lead to healthier eating practices in adulthood? The researchers arrived at a compelling—if unsurprising—conclusion: It can. (source)

August is dedicated to Kids Eat Right Month!

This summer I ran a kid’s culinary camp at the Willow School with Living Plate. It was an absolutely amazing experience for me as the instructor and for the kid’s gaining confidence in the kitchen.

I love working with kids, as I like to think I am a big kid myself. My biggest priority for our culinary camp was to create a positive and inviting environment.

Kids in the Kitchen: Becoming Food Explorers by Chef Julie Harrington, RD @chefjulie_rd

Each morning the first activity we did was called “Food Explorers” where we learned about our 5 senses and how they respond when we try new foods. Our group was very adventurous, so we took it up a notch and took away sight for when they were experiencing the feel and taste sections of the activity. Why? Because we eat with our eyes first and for kids, a sight of a new food can be very intimidating with the fear of the unknown and many kids tend to avoid the situation.

Kids in the Kitchen: Becoming Food Explorers by Chef Julie Harrington, RD @chefjulie_rd

Creating an inviting environment around food:

Creating a positive environment was key for this activity. Trying new foods can be intimidating and a very new experience for picky eaters. Every day with this activity there were ground rules, that everyone was allowed to experience this activity at their own pace, we weren’t allowed to “yuck” anyone else’s “yum” (because everyone will experience it a little differently!), and they were each given a spit cup to politely use if they didn’t enjoy the taste.

Kids in the Kitchen: Becoming Food Explorers by Chef Julie Harrington, RD @chefjulie_rd

It was a very eye-opening experience for all the participants. A few responses included:

My mom tried to get me to try this, but I thought I would like it. It’s delicious!

This fruit taste like candy. I would eat this for dessert.

 

As we continued to explore our 5 senses with the new foods it was a learning experience for all understanding that everyone enjoys certain foods more than others and that’s okay! Everyone’s taste buds are a little different.

As adults, we often let our own food preferences or our preconceived notions of what children will or will not prefer. I enjoyed letting everyone adding to the discussion about the foods and letting them fully explore these foods forming their own opinions. I strongly feel that letting them explore and make their own thoughts and ideas by continually exposing them to new foods without any pressure surrounding it.

Kids in the Kitchen: Becoming Food Explorers by Chef Julie Harrington, RD @chefjulie_rd

Want to join in the food explorer fun! Download this free worksheet to get started.


(opens in a new window)
[Download HERE]

Download this FREE Food Explorers worksheet by Chef Julie Harrington, RD @chefjulie_rd[Download HERE]

 

I will be adding more children culinary events to my calendar soon! Check back to my upcoming events page, so you don’t miss out!

Chef Julie Harrington, RD - Where food and love meet in the kitchen @ChefJulie_RD

Want to find kid-friendly recipes to make with kids? Recipe ReDux members are whipping up fun recipes kids of all ages (and adults) will enjoy making.

Healthy Breakfast Tips

Never skip breakfast again with a few helpful tips that can help you stay on track with eating healthy all week!
Whole Grain Get-Up-And-Go Bars + Cabot Cookbook Giveaway via RDelicious Kitchen

The most common thing I hear in my nutrition counseling sessions is “I don’t eat breakfast, because I don’t have time”. I know you’ve heard it time and time again, but breakfast is the most important meal of the day. The word “breakfast” literally means ‘breaking’ your ‘fast’ from your last meal the night before. When you don’t eat breakfast, your body enters into a prolonged fasting state. It starts to believe that you won’t be eating any time soon. These breakfast skippers tend to eat more food than usual at the next meal or grab high calorie snack to stave off hunger.
How can you solve this breakfast skipping problem?
[Make, Freeze, Reheat, Repeat]
This is a big timesaver for me during the week. There are many breakfast foods that you can make in advance that store well in the freezer, then to be quickly reheated on busy weekday mornings.
1 . Whole Grain Get-Up-And-Go Bars (pictured above that I made from the Cabot Creamery cookbook)
2. Love Muffins
3. Protein Pancakes
[Prep the night before]
With a little effort the night before, you can feel okay about hitting the snooze button in the morning knowing your breakfast is about ready to go as you rush out the door. For smoothies, I even put everything in the blender and pop in in the fridge and all I have to do is maybe add a little ice and blend and go.
1. Protein Smoothie
2. Overnight Oats
3. The Easiest Deviled Eggs
[Grab & Go]
Let’s be honest, sometimes the tips mentioned about don’t necessarily happen. There are some pre-packaged foods that are made with real food ingredients that you can grab in the morning. Add a piece of fruit or a yogurt on the side to make it complete.
1. KIND bars
2. Garden Lites – Veggie Muffins
3. Siggi’s yogurt
Just always make sure to keep your breakfast balanced with a mix of carbohydrates, fats, and protein!

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bloggercontest.slate

CABOT CREAMERY COOKBOOK GIVEAWAY!!
One lucky person will win a copy of the Cabot Creamery Cookbook and a $25 Cabot Gift Box.
Contest will run through Friday, May 22nd 11:59 pm EST. 

GIVEAWAY HAS ENDED.
Congrats to Stacey who has won the Cabot Creamery cookbook and gift box!

Multiple ways to enter:

1 // Leave a comment of your healthy breakfast tip to keep you stay on track all week.
2 // Follow @RD_Kitchen & @cabotcheese on Twitter and tweet about this giveaway.
(please leave a comment if doing so)
3 // Follow RDelicious Kitchen & Cabot Creamery Cooperative on Facebook and share this giveaway.
(please leave a comment if doing so)

Signature

Disclosure: Being a member of the Cabot Cheese Board, this giveaway is made possible by Cabot Creamery to provide an awesome RDelcious Kitchen readers with a cookbook and Cabot gift basket. I was not compensated to write this post, all opinions expressed here are my own.  

Becoming a Registered Dietitian: Part Three

Happy National Registered Dietitian Day. As we wrap up this informational series of becoming a Registered Dietitian (Part One, Part Two) to celebrate National Nutrition Month, stay tuned the rest of the month for guest RD’s to share their stories. 

 
National Nutrition Month - Take a Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle: Becoming a Registered Dietitian via RDelicious Kitchen
It is a special day for Registered Dietitians. March 11th is National Registered Dietitian Day!!

As the nation’s food and nutrition experts, registered dietitian nutritionists are committed to improving the health of their patients and community. Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Day commemorates the dedication of RDNs as advocates for advancing the nutritional status of Americans and people around the world.

Passing RD exam #rdchat
The title of this post should really be, “Life as a Registered Dietitian”. This is my first time celebrating this holiday and I am very excited.
Becoming a Registered Dietitian: Part Three - Life as a Registered Dietitian via Julie @ RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen
The doors have really opened up for a career in dietetics over the years.
Employment opportunities RDs or RDNs work in a wide variety of settings, including health care, business and industry, community/public health, education, research, government agencies and private practice. Many work environments, particularly those in medical and health-care settings, require that an individual be credentialed as an RD or RDN.
RDs or RDNs work in:

  • Hospitals, clinics or other health-care facilities, educating patients about nutrition and administering medical nutrition therapy as part of the health-care team. They may also manage the foodservice operations in these settings, or schools, daycare centers or correctional facilities, overseeing everything from food purchasing and preparation to managing staff.
  • Sports nutrition and corporate well ness programs, educating clients about the connection between food, fitness and health.
  • Food and nutrition-related business and industries, working in communications, consumer affairs, public relations, marketing, product development or consulting with chefs in restaurants and culinary schools.
  • Private practice, working under contract with healthcare or food companies, or in their own business. RDs or RDNs work with foodservice or restaurant managers, food vendors and distributors, athletes, nursing home residents or company employees.
  • Community and public health settings, teaching, monitoring and advising the public and helping improve quality of life through healthy eating habits.
  • Universities and medical centers, teaching physician’s assistants, nurses, dietetics students, dentists and others about the sophisticated science of food and nutrition.
  • Research areas in food and pharmaceutical companies, universities and hospitals directing or conducting experiments to answer critical nutrition questions and find alternative foods or nutrition recommendations for the public.
    (source)

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Throughout my dietetic internship I really grew professionally. It helped me find my niche in the dietetics world. Just like any field someone knows someone, so it is always good to network and make long lasting relationships. Meeting so many professionals in the field with new preceptors almost weekly opened so many doors and opportunities.
For myself personally, I knew the clinical environment was just not for me. While I liked the action in the hospital, I wasn’t able to utilize my culinary training like I would have liked to. I looked for other options when I was applying for my first job as a Registered Dietitian.

I am now using my Registered Dietitian certification and culinary degree in so many ways.
As you many know, if you are a consistent reader of RDelicious Kitchen, I am a Supermarket RD for a grocery chain in the northeast. This job is more than I could have even dreamed of. What’s a better place to provide nutrition education, than the place they shop for all of their food! As a Supermarket RD, I provide FREE nutrition services to the customers, employees, and the community – like nutrition education classes, seminars, presentations, consultations, grocery store tours, adult cooking classes, kids cooking classes, plus so much more! Every month I provide a calendar of events for customers to participate in. Customers and employees are able to sign up for individual appointments at any time and their is no limit to how many times they are allowed to come, which is amazing, because often times insurance may only cover 2-3 visits with a RD.
Supermarket Grocery Store Tour
I really get to showcase my culinary training by teaching many cooking classes for adults and kids. It’s an awesome way to introduce new healthy foods to customers that they may not have seen before or too scared to try themselves. For example, one of my classes I recently used the whole grain teff, and not one person in my class had even heard about it before. Plus, I help customers learn new cooking techniques that they can utilize in their own kitchens. This is one of my favorite things to do at work.
Supermarket RD's Pick
Since I work in a grocery store full time, I like to share with my readers here what my latest “Supermarket RD Pick” is to introduce even more people to healthier choices found right in your grocery store.
Along with working as a Supermarket RD, I also work as a personal chef and recently started culinary nutrition consulting work on the side, and of course writing here at RDelicious Kitchen!
Connect with me on Linkedin!
Interested in becoming a Registered Dietitian or already on your way? Hope this mini series was helpful! Don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any questions: email – [email protected]
Stay tuned for the rest of this month as some guest RD’s will be sharing their stories!
RDelicious Kitchen
Disclosure: I received permission by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for use of NNM logo. 
 

Becoming a Registered Dietitian: Part Two

Join Julie at RDelicious Kitchen as she shares the steps in order to become a Registered Dietitian and her journey to becoming a RD.

National Nutrition Month - Take a Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle: Becoming a Registered Dietitian via RDelicious Kitchen

March is National Nutrition Month. Myself and other dietitians are blogging all month to celebrate. So far on RDelicious Kitchen, we have covered what the difference between a Registered Dietitian and a Nutritionist and Part One of becoming a Registered Dietitian.

Becoming a Registered Dietitian: Part One covered Steps 1 & 2 of becoming a Registered Dietitian, about college courses and the dietetic internship you must complete in order to be eligible to take the RD Exam. In case you missed it, stop there first.

Becoming a Registered Dietitian: Part Two - Study materials to prepare for the RD exam via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen

Today is all about Step 3 – Study materials to help prepare you to pass the RD exam. While completing the dietetic internship you learn so much, you really need to study to be fully prepared to take the RD exam.

The exam is broken up into 4 domains: Food & Nutrition Sciences, Nutrition Care, Management of Food & Nutrition, and Foodservice Systems.

The exam is always taken at a test center that must follow the regulations of the exam. It is computerized and you are provided with a calculator and a mini white board to work out answers.

What's on the RD exam? via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen(source)

The questions are not in any specific order. The exam gives a minimum of 125 questions. Out of those 125 questions, 100 of them count toward the exam and 25 of them are testing for future RD exam questions. I personally, did not like knowing this. When I got to a particularly hard questions I second guessed if it was a real question or a question for future exam that wasn’t counting toward my exam.

Also, 125 exam questions is the minimum. You could get up to 145 exam questions. As you are taking the exam it is being monitored of the difficulty level. If the examinee receives more difficult questions throughout, fewer questions are needed to be answered correctly to pass the exam. Personally, I had all 145 questions.

The exam has a time limit set for 2.5 hours. You must answer each question to move on to the next one. The exam times out once the 2.5 hours are up.

The exam costs $200 dollars. If you happen to not pass the first time, you unfortunately have to wait 6 weeks to take the exam again.

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Before you take the exam, you have to fully prepare yourself. There are various study materials out there to utilize. I want to share the ones I have used and other resources that are available.

Becoming a Registered Dietitian: Part Two - study materials for the RD exam via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen

Jean Inman’s Study Guide
You could go to her two day seminar to go through all the material in full detail, or you can purchase the materials to study at home. While it’s a little pricy at $385, I believe it was 100% worth it and I valued this guide the most and felt like it prepared me the best.

The study materials include:

• Detailed, comprehensive Study Manual following CDR study guidelines, covering all Domains. We do all the research, so your time is spent studying, not searching for information!
• All lectures on CD. Listen as you study the Manual. Because most of what is discussed is printed for you in the Manual, note-taking will be minimized. Your time can be spent learning.
• Over 1000 sample test questions.
• Tips on how to study and how to take the computerized test.
• Individual support provided by mail, phone or e-mail. If you have questions after you have studied a section.
The study materials are very in depth covering the nitty-gritty details that will appear on the exam. I would listen to the CDs in the car or on my iPod and go for a walk. [Side note: An embarrassing moment happened when I just put my iPod on shuffle before teaching a spin class. On the the tracks from the study guide came on and was talking about anthocyanins and the gym go-ers were a tad confused. lol]
Visual Veggies

Get the experience you need to prepare yourself for the Registration Exam for Dietitians.  The RD Practice Exam is a multiple-choice quiz application that closely resembles the actual RD Exam.  The practice exams contain questions comparable to what is asked on the actual exam.  All exam domains and their subcategories are included with many questions in each.  The practice exams are timed tests to simulate the pressure of test-taking with limited time.  Beyond the actual exam, the RD Practice Exam provides immediate feedback on whether the selected answer is correct or incorrect.  Plus, a detailed description for each question explains more about the topic for a full learning experience.

I really loved Visual Veggies. It was great to have a structure like the how the RD exam would be – a timed series of questions. While Jean Inman’s practice questions had an answer key to the questions, I preferred Visual Veggies practice tests, because it had an explanation for each question you got incorrect.
What is also great, is that you can download the software to your computer, iPad, iPhone, or iPhone touch so you can easily study on the go!
Becoming a Registered Dietitian: Part Two - Study Materials via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen
Becoming a Registered Dietitian: Part Two - Study Materials via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen
The practice exams also give you a breakdown of how you did with the questions from each domain. This was a big help to see which areas I was strong in and other areas that I was weak in and needed to study more. The software can take an average of all of your exams taken to give you an overall average in each domain as well.
Becoming a Registered Dietitian: Part Two - Study Materials via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen** Other study materials my fellow RD friends have used: materials from EatRight.org, RDstudy.com, RD Exam Secrets Study Guide. I have not personally used any of these. If you have used any of these before, please share what you liked/didn’t like about these study materials.

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Tips for studying and taking the exam:

Becoming a Registered Dietitian: Part Two - study materials via RDelicious Kitchen @rdkitchen

1. Give yourself a timeline.
I scheduled my exam the second my paperwork went through for completing my dietetic internship. Knowing when I was taking the exam, I scheduled the days I would study and planned what domains I would cover each of those days.
2. Get out of the house.
Studying at home, I would often get distracted. I became Starbucks best customers during those weeks of studying. I would be more focused when I was studying elsewhere. Plus, the perk was a a treat to a latte.
3. Practice!
Yes, you may have majority of the material memorized, but make sure you are able to apply the information to answer the exam questions. I personally felt the exam questions were great prep to apply the information studied.
4. Don’t overstudy.
Often times, overstudying can lead to second guessing the answers. Which brings to the next tip.
5. Be confident!
Be confident in your answers. What took me awhile to get used to, was that you had to answer the question to move forward to the next questions, and not able to go back to any questions. I would get super anxious about this, but remember you don’t have to get a perfect score. The questions I noticed I was taking a little too long on, I would try to eliminate as many wrong answers as I could and make an educated guess.
6. Celebrate!!!!
You just passed the RD exam. Congrats on becoming a Registered Dietitian. It is am amazing feeling after passing the exam. All the hard work feels like it has truly paid off!
Passing RD exam #rdchat
RDelicious Kitchen
Disclosure: I received permission by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for use of NNM logo. I was provided the Visual Veggies software for free. All thoughts and opinions are my own.